Pierre Berjole (1897-1990) Modern French artist 'In the Dressing Room' Pierre Berjole (1897-1990) Modern French artist 'In the Dressing Room' framed
Pierre Berjole (1897-1990) Modern French artist 'In the Dressing Room' Pierre Berjole (1897-1990) Modern French artist 'In the Dressing Room' framed
About Pierre Berjole (1897-1990)

A man of many parts, Berjole was a painter, art teacher, illustrator, art school director, theatrical scene painter and interior decorator. He entered the École des Beaux-Arts in Tours but war service interrupted his studies. After the armistice he continued at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris and at Montparnasse. On graduation he settled in Paris becoming a member of the Montparnasse group of artists that included Paul Cézanne and Jean-Léon Gérome. At this time he was known for traditional landscapes painted across rural France, Corsica and the Balearic Islands. Between the wars he moved to North Africa, adopting the Orientalist style and began teaching at the School of Fine Arts in Tunis. He was appointed the School’s Director shortly afterwards. He illustrated a number of literary and musical works. Returning to France he settled in Nice, where he continued to paint until his death in 1990.

In the Dressing Room

£3,850
This is one of the newest arrivals, sourced by an American dealer friend who knows our soft spot for theatrical subjects. An otherwise rather ordinary painter of landscapes and North African towns, it was when sitting in the wings or dressing rooms back stage that Berjole really excelled. There is so much life in this painting, the rustle of costumes and hum of gossip punctuated by stage calls and distant applause. A window on the Paris theatres between the wars that hadn’t changed much since Lautrec’s day.
Reserved
About Pierre Berjole (1897-1990)

A man of many parts, Berjole was a painter, art teacher, illustrator, art school director, theatrical scene painter and interior decorator. He entered the École des Beaux-Arts in Tours but war service interrupted his studies. After the armistice he continued at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris and at Montparnasse. On graduation he settled in Paris becoming a member of the Montparnasse group of artists that included Paul Cézanne and Jean-Léon Gérome. At this time he was known for traditional landscapes painted across rural France, Corsica and the Balearic Islands. Between the wars he moved to North Africa, adopting the Orientalist style and began teaching at the School of Fine Arts in Tunis. He was appointed the School’s Director shortly afterwards. He illustrated a number of literary and musical works. Returning to France he settled in Nice, where he continued to paint until his death in 1990.